Sunday, October 13, 2013

Quotes: John Locke and Adam Smith

Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him.

The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom. For in all the states of created beings capable of law, where there is no law, there is no freedom.

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.

The patrimony which every man has in his own labour, as it is the original foundation of all other property, so it is the most sacred and inviolable. The patrimony of a poor man lies in the strength and dexterity of his hand; and to hinder him from employing this strength and dexterity in what manner he thinks proper without injury to his neighbour is a plain violation of this most sacred property.

Parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain.

There is frequently more to be learned from the unexpected questions of a child than the discourses of men.

Where all is but dream, reasoning and arguments are of no use, truth and knowledge nothing.

--Locke

All money is a matter of belief.

As soon as the land of any country has all become private property, the landlords, like all other men, love to reap where they never sowed, and demand a rent even for its natural produce.

Consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production; and the interest of the producer ought to be attended to, only so far as it may be necessary for promoting that of the consumer.

It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own interest.

Labor was the first price, the original purchase - money that was paid for all things.

Resentment seems to have been given us by nature for a defense, and for a defense only! It is the safeguard of justice and the security of innocence.

Science is the great antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition.

The theory that can absorb the greatest number of facts, and persist in doing so, generation after generation, through all changes of opinion and detail, is the one that must rule all observation.

Virtue is more to be feared than vice, because its excesses are not subject to the regulation of conscience.

--Adam Smith

I find Smith more interesting, personally.

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